Our Services

Schieber Family Pharmacy, a member of The Medicine Shoppe family is dedicated to your health and fast, friendly service is our specialty. We don’t use an automated phone service—we answer our own phones. You won’t wait long for your prescriptions, and we always take time to answer questions about your medication.

We carry compression stockings, wound care products, medical equipment, urological supplies, back braces, post mastectomy products, ostomy supplies and a wide variety of medications and services for the diabetic patient. We also administer vaccines for the seasonal flu, H1N1, shingles and pneumonia. And, if you can’t find a special medication you’re looking for, just ask and we can order it for you.

We'll do more than fill prescriptions! We offer a great selection of vitamins, over-the-counter products, cough and cold supplies as well as support braces. We've got you covered!

         

Learn more:

  • Home Healthcare

    Ask us about our home healthcare supplies and medical equipment! We are here to help!
  • Home Healthcare Products

    Browse the "Solutions for Everyday Living" catalog
  • Medicare Website

    Medicare.gov provides information about the parts of Medicare, what's new, and how to find Medicare plans, facilities, or providers.
  • Medication Therapy Management

    Questions about your prescription? We can help. Make your prescriptions work for you with our medication review service.

  • Operation Medicine Drop

    Schieber Family Pharmacy held its first prsecription take-back day on July 9, 2011. Prescription drugs were dropped off and collected by the sheriff's department to help keep the community safe.
  • OTC Products and More!

    We carry a great selection of over-the-counter products and much more!

FAQs

  • Q:

    When does flu season start? When should I get a flu shot?

    A:
    Flu season begins in the fall and ends in spring with the peak of flu season occurring from late November through March. Flu vaccine is available now at Schieber Family Pharmacy.
  • Q:

    How do I know if I have the flu?

    A:
    Visit your healthcare provider if you exhibit a combination of symptoms such as: • Fever • Cough • Sore throat • Runny or stuffy nose • Muscle or body aches • Headaches • Fatigue The flu is a respiratory virus and usually does not cause vomiting or diarrhea although those symptoms can happen with children.
  • Q:

    Do I need two flu shots this year like I did last year?

    A:
    No. The 2010-2011 flu vaccine will protect against 2009 H1N1 and two other influenza viruses.
  • Q:

    I was vaccinated for H1N1 and the seasonal flu last year. Do I need another flu vaccination this year?

    A:
    Yes. Influenza viruses are constantly changing so antibody made against one strain will become less effective against new strains as flu strains evolve over time. Also, there are different types of flu viruses circulating and different variants within different types and the same type of flu virus does not necessarily circulate each year. The safest and most effective way to ward off the flu is to get vaccinated every year.
  • Q:

    Who is at the highest risk for complications from the flu?

    A:
    According to the CDC, the following groups are at highest risk for flu complications: • Children younger than 2 years old • Adults 65 years and older • Pregnant women and women up to 2 weeks from end of pregnancy • People with certain chronic medical conditions (such as asthma, heart failure, chronic lung disease) and people with a weak immune system (such as diabetes, HIV) • People younger than 19 years of age who are receiving long-term aspirin therapy
  • Q:

    Are there medications to treat the flu?

    A:
    Yes. Your healthcare provider can prescribe antiviral drugs that fight against the flu in your body. Antiviral drugs are a second line of defense against the flu once you have already contracted the illness. There are currently two medications available. They are oseltamivir and zanamivir and they are primarily used to treat very ill people who contract the flu (for example someone hospitalized) or in danger of serious complications resulting from the flu virus. Treatment plans vary but in most cases it is best to take the medication within two days of contracting the illness for a period of five days.
  • Q:

    Are there any side effects of the flu medications?

    A:
    Depending on the type of antiviral prescribed side effects vary but most common are stomach upset and diarrhea. The pharmacist will review side effects with you if you are prescribed these medications.
  • Q:

    Are there any over the counter medications I should avoid if I am taking prescribed flu medications?

    A:
    Currently there are no over the counter medications that should be avoided when taking prescribed flu medications but always check with your doctor and your pharmacist regarding your particular health situation when combining medications.
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